OBDII in Daihatsus

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OBDII in Daihatsus

Postby freddyzdead » Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:29 pm

Hi
I'm new here, but there seems to be a lot of knowledgeable people here, so, here goes:
I have a 2003 Daihatsu Copen, which I absolutely love. It has an OBDII connector under the dash, right where you'd expect it to be. But no matter what I plug into it, nothing can communicate with it. Code readers fire up, try all the protocols, and then give up. Before this I had a 2003 Daihatsu Sirion, same thing. It didn't matter too much with that one, because I never needed to tinker with it. But the turbocharged little Copen is another matter. I am puzzled, because although it has the expected MIL lamp in the instrument cluster, it has never come on once in all the time I've owned the car, except for when the ignition is on and the engine isn't running. I find it very hard to believe that nothing noteworthy has occurred in all that time. There are other issues; I have only one key for this car, and I would like to program another. The instructions I have for doing this involve shorting two pins in the OBD socket, and introduce the car to the new key, after which it should be programmed. Nope, doesn't work. Anyway, I cannot find any info anywhere about any of this. The only thing I know for sure is that this same model and year in UK and Europe do indeed have OBDII, so why don't ours? Can it be that Daihatsu has deliberately removed this function from all Australian cars? That's how it looks, but there's nobody to ask. Daihatsu have long ago packed up and gone home, thanks to Toyota, who now owns Daihatsu outright.

Besides the engine ECU, this car has little computers all over the place, for the ABS, roof, windows, etc., and I think they all talk to each other, so I'm being pretty careful. The disappearing roof is really neat, but I wouldn't want to be trying to figure out what to do if it suddenly quits working.

So, I'm wondering why does it have the connector if there's no function?

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Re: OBDII in Daihatsus

Postby antus » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:30 am

Protocol on the uk vehicles seems to be iso 9141-2 which is a less common variant. Does the obd port have a wire in pin 7, 15? Ground on 4,5? B+ on 15?

Being a less common protocol its possible your elm is missing bits too.

There is also a mention of copen here https://www.outilsobdfacile.com/vehicle ... 2/daihatsu
Have you read the FAQ? For lots of information and links to significant threads see here: viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1396

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Re: OBDII in Daihatsus

Postby ar5boosted » Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:09 pm

freddyzdead wrote:Hi
I'm new here, but there seems to be a lot of knowledgeable people here, so, here goes:
I have a 2003 Daihatsu Copen, which I absolutely love. It has an OBDII connector under the dash, right where you'd expect it to be. But no matter what I plug into it, nothing can communicate with it. Code readers fire up, try all the protocols, and then give up. Before this I had a 2003 Daihatsu Sirion, same thing. It didn't matter too much with that one, because I never needed to tinker with it. But the turbocharged little Copen is another matter. I am puzzled, because although it has the expected MIL lamp in the instrument cluster, it has never come on once in all the time I've owned the car, except for when the ignition is on and the engine isn't running. I find it very hard to believe that nothing noteworthy has occurred in all that time. There are other issues; I have only one key for this car, and I would like to program another. The instructions I have for doing this involve shorting two pins in the OBD socket, and introduce the car to the new key, after which it should be programmed. Nope, doesn't work. Anyway, I cannot find any info anywhere about any of this. The only thing I know for sure is that this same model and year in UK and Europe do indeed have OBDII, so why don't ours? Can it be that Daihatsu has deliberately removed this function from all Australian cars? That's how it looks, but there's nobody to ask. Daihatsu have long ago packed up and gone home, thanks to Toyota, who now owns Daihatsu outright.

Besides the engine ECU, this car has little computers all over the place, for the ABS, roof, windows, etc., and I think they all talk to each other, so I'm being pretty careful. The disappearing roof is really neat, but I wouldn't want to be trying to figure out what to do if it suddenly quits working.

So, I'm wondering why does it have the connector if there's no function?


Hello,

Well first off I would assume that it's something that you are not doing correctly. I don't say being critical, it's just that I have had the same sounding issues on cars that I have owned. Plus, when they are less common, it makes getting help even harder again because 'nobody knows'.

It could be your OBD dongle? is it Bluetooth? can you confirm that it is paired ? Have you used it on another vehicle ?

I rebuilt my Toyota Celica and learned a lot from doing lots of trips to Japan and trawling Japanese electronic auction sites. The ECU's that Daihatsu would have used would have been either Fujitsu or Denso. There are no other ECU OEMs (mutters Delco) that I know on Japanese vehicles.

Here is a link to the s/h Copen ECU's for sale that I know of in Japan : https://auctions.yahoo.co.jp/search/search;?p=copen+ecu

That's good and something to bear in mind. The ECU might have been a special order but its most likely made by one of the larger companies (my guess - Denso). It's not for instance a special batch from a company hidden in the Forest in Romania - like some Euro cars (looking at you Renault/Citroen/Peugeot/Audi). :thumbdown: Japanese companies don't seem to work that way.

Personally, I would play dumb.

You could take it to a mechanic that you know and ask them to read it for 'Fault Codes'. If you can see that they can connect then hand them the $25 - well they have proved that it works. If they can't connect, then don't pay the mechanic anything "what's so hard? you foil!" + drive away.

Good luck, keep trying.

Image
You will get this to work - maybe. Perhaps that is an inside ECU shot.

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Re: OBDII in Daihatsus

Postby freddyzdead » Tue Sep 12, 2017 4:19 pm

Hey, thanks for the encouragement. I went via Buyee to the Yahoo link you gave me, but couldn't get it to give me any more info. I click on the picture of the item or the description and nothing happens. I'm not even sure how to identify the equivalent of the ebay "Buy it Now". If I could get an ECU for a hundred bucks or so to have a play with, it could be interesting. I'm not about to go experimenting with the only one I've got. (the one in the car) I successfully bought a custom-made "racing" radiator through Buyee earlier this year. Cheaper than a stock radiator here, if I could have found one, that is. The radiator is made of 100% aluminium, beautifully hand-welded; the only thing wrong is that it's twice as thick as the original, and the bonnet and front bumper don't fit together well anymore.

I have tried at least 6 different OBD readers, they all do the same thing. I have a friend whose husband is a mechanic; he told me he hasn't been able to get any communication with any Daihatsu he's tried. So that's why I wondered what would happen if I swapped the ECU with one from a country where this model is known to have OBD, would it work, or would I just trade one problem for a bunch of others? Information is what's really scarce. Although I have the workshop manual, there's a lot it doesn't mention, and it's full of that typical Japanese inscrutability. The ECU is shown in the electrical section of the manual, but only as a black box. No mention is made of it anywhere. For years I tried unsuccessfully to find any information at all about the Sirion I owned at the time, and never found anything at all. As if it didn't exist. I later found that in Europe the Sirion is called Daihatsu Storia, or Toyota Duet. I did eventually manage to find a service manual, but it's in Russian.

I want the OBD functionality, not just for error logging, but for some of the really useful stuff, like key programming. I've only got one key for the car; if anything happened to it, I'd be screwed. Getting the remote door locks to work would be very useful as well. I'm on the verge of fitting an aftermarket door lock system, but if I could activate the native one, I would much prefer that.

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Re: OBDII in Daihatsus

Postby ar5boosted » Tue Sep 12, 2017 4:49 pm

freddyzdead wrote:I went via Buyee to the Yahoo link you gave me, but couldn't get it to give me any more info.


Try importmonster - http://www.importmonster.com.au/yahoo/?cat=0&term=L880K Importmonster are good because they have a translate to English button available so you have a chance of reducing flying junk landing from Japan :-)

freddyzdead wrote:I have a friend whose husband is a mechanic; he told me he hasn't been able to get any communication with any Daihatsu he's tried.


Oh well. That's how the cooky crumbles sometimes.

rey the key, here http://www.importmonster.com.au/view?ur ... j444164728 is the link to show [hoping its a match - but not certain] the ECU and the key immobiliser as a separate controller.

Image

That's the matched pair set I believe needed to recreate a lost key.

As for remote door opening, yes you might need to go aftermarket.

If you have an exact question, I have contacts in Japan and I might be able to ask them to make a call to Japan to try to find out. I'd be a bit surprised if a locksmith couldn't cut a key. The locks are all done separate to the Carmaker by third-party-OEMs. The locksmiths open their global book and get a key number and a cutting sequence. They also have privileged information to enable them to do it [make money].

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